Showing posts with label Abraham Lincoln. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Abraham Lincoln. Show all posts

"About ten days ago, I retired very late. I had been up waiting for important dispatches from the front. I could not have been long in bed when I fell into a slumber, for I was weary. I soon began to dream. There seemed to be a death-like stillness about me. Then I heard subdued sobs, as if a number of people were weeping. I thought I left my bed and wandered downstairs. There the silence was broken by the same pitiful sobbing, but the mourners were invisible. I went from room to room; no living person was in sight, but the same mournful sounds of distress met me as I passed along. I saw light in all the rooms; every object was familiar to me; but where were all the people who were grieving as if their hearts would break? I was puzzled and alarmed. What could be the meaning of all this? Determined to find the cause of a state of things so mysterious and so shocking, I kept on until I arrived at the East Room, which I entered. There I met with a sickening surprise. Before me was a catafalque, on which rested a corpse wrapped in funeral vestments. Around it were stationed soldiers who were acting as guards; and there was a throng of people, gazing mournfully upon the corpse, whose face was covered, others weeping pitifully. 'Who is dead in the White House?' I demanded of one of the soldiers, 'The President,' was his answer; 'he was killed by an assassin.' Then came a loud burst of grief from the crowd, which woke me from my dream. I slept no more that night; and although it was only a dream, I have been strangely annoyed by it ever since." - Abraham Lincoln

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"About ten days ago, I retired very late. I had been up waiting for important dispatches from the front. I could not have been long in bed when I fell into a slumber, for I was weary. I soon began to dream. There seemed to be a death-like stillness about me. Then I heard subdued sobs, as if a number of people were weeping. I thought I left my bed and wandered downstairs. There the silence was broken by the same pitiful sobbing, but the mourners were invisible. I went from room to room; no living person was in sight, but the same mournful sounds of distress met me as I passed along. I saw light in all the rooms; every object was familiar to me; but where were all the people who were grieving as if their hearts would break? I was puzzled and alarmed. What could be the meaning of all this? Determined to find the cause of a state of things so mysterious and so shocking, I kept on until I arrived at the East Room, which I entered. There I met with a sickening surprise. Before me was a catafalque, on which rested a corpse wrapped in funeral vestments. Around it were stationed soldiers who were acting as guards; and there was a throng of people, gazing mournfully upon the corpse, whose face was covered, others weeping pitifully. 'Who is dead in the White House?' I demanded of one of the soldiers, 'The President,' was his answer; 'he was killed by an assassin.' Then came a loud burst of grief from the crowd, which woke me from my dream. I slept no more that night; and although it was only a dream, I have been strangely annoyed by it ever since." - Abraham Lincoln
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"I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. You and we are different races. We have between us a broader difference than exists between almost any other two races. Whether it is right or wrong I need not discuss, but this physical difference is a great disadvantage to us both, as I think your race suffers very greatly, many of them, by living among us, while ours suffers from your presence. In a word, we suffer on each side. If this is admitted, it affords a reason at least why we should be separated. "I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races. There is a natural disgust in the minds of nearly all white people to the idea of indiscriminate amalgamation of the white and black races … " - Abraham Lincoln

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"I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. You and we are different races. We have between us a broader difference than exists between almost any other two races. Whether it is right or wrong I need not discuss, but this physical difference is a great disadvantage to us both, as I think your race suffers very greatly, many of them, by living among us, while ours suffers from your presence. In a word, we suffer on each side. If this is admitted, it affords a reason at least why we should be separated.

"I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races. There is a natural disgust in the minds of nearly all white people to the idea of indiscriminate amalgamation of the white and black races … " - Abraham Lincoln
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"If slavery is not wrong, then nothing is wrong." - Abraham Lincoln

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"If slavery is not wrong, then nothing is wrong." - Abraham Lincoln
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"Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history. We…will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance, or insignificance, can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass, will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation." - Abraham Lincoln

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"Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history. We…will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance, or insignificance, can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass, will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation." - Abraham Lincoln
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"When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. And that's my religion." - Abraham Lincoln

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"When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. And that's my religion." - Abraham Lincoln 
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"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." - Abraham Lincoln (Gettysburg Address)

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"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." - Abraham Lincoln (Gettysburg Address)
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“Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.” - Abraham Lincoln

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“Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.” - Abraham Lincoln
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"It often requires more courage to dare to do right than to fear to do wrong." - Abraham Lincoln

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"It often requires more courage to dare to do right than to fear to do wrong." - Abraham Lincoln
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"The time comes upon every public man when it is best for him to keep his lips closed." - Abraham Lincoln

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"The time comes upon every public man when it is best for him to keep his lips closed." - Abraham Lincoln
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"I am a success today because I had a friend who believed in me and I didn't have the heart to let him down." - Abraham Lincoln

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"I am a success today because I had a friend who believed in me and I didn't have the heart to let him down." - Abraham Lincoln
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"If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I'd spend six hours sharpening my ax." - Abraham Lincoln

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"If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I'd spend six hours sharpening my ax." - Abraham Lincoln
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"These capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert, to fleece the people." - Abraham Lincoln

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"These capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert, to fleece the people." - Abraham Lincoln
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"I have been driven to my knees many times because there was no place else to go." - Abraham Lincoln

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"I have been driven to my knees many times because there was no place else to go." - Abraham Lincoln
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"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

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"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln
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"It is difficult to make a man miserable while he feels worthy of himself and claims kindred to the great God who made him." - Abraham Lincoln

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"It is difficult to make a man miserable while he feels worthy of himself and claims kindred to the great God who made him." - Abraham Lincoln
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"Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing." - Abraham Lincoln

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"Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing." - Abraham Lincoln
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"You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time." - Abraham Lincoln

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"You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time." - +Abraham Lincoln
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